Miller's Crossing Development Options

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The Town of Victoria Park is considering the purchase of three parcels of land, known as Miller's Crossing, that has been used as public open space since 2004.

The land is owned by the Western Australian Planning Commission (WAPC) who originally purchased it to make way for the railway crossing at Millers Street. Since the construction of the crossing in 2004, the Town has maintained the land as open space for the community.

In 2012, the Town asked the WAPC (via a project called Amendment 56) to reserve the land for ‘Parks and Recreation’ to ensure it could continue to

The Town of Victoria Park is considering the purchase of three parcels of land, known as Miller's Crossing, that has been used as public open space since 2004.

The land is owned by the Western Australian Planning Commission (WAPC) who originally purchased it to make way for the railway crossing at Millers Street. Since the construction of the crossing in 2004, the Town has maintained the land as open space for the community.

In 2012, the Town asked the WAPC (via a project called Amendment 56) to reserve the land for ‘Parks and Recreation’ to ensure it could continue to be used as public open space into the future. In 2017 the WAPC informed the Town that they did not agree with this request and instructed the Town to modify their proposal to zone three of the lots as ‘Residential R30’. This would mean that the land could be subdivided into housing lots.

Following this instruction the Town continued to request a Parks and Recreation reservation at which point the WAPC offered the Town the opportunity to purchase the land and therefore have greater control over how is zoned in the future.

The Town undertook community engagement in June 2018 to ask if the community wanted to purchase the land, and for what purpose. Five development options were considered, with over 214 submissions received.

In August 2018 the Council delayed its decision on purchasing the land until a Public Open Strategy was prepared. As the Public Open Space strategy has now been completed, Council will be considering the purchase of the land once again.

What are the five development options being considered?

  • Option 1 - Do nothing. Council does not acquire the three lots from the WAPC. No cost to Council, estimated future annual rate revenue in the order of $21,000.
  • Option 2 - Acquire all lots for public open space. All three lots are acquired from the WAPC with independent valuations and retained as public open space. Land acquisition cost between $2.37 million to $2.9 million, continuation of annual maintenance expense (already budgeted).
  • Option 3 - Acquire only some lots for public open space. One to two of the lots are acquired from the WAPC rather than all three and retained as public open space. Land acquisition cost between $0.8 million to $1.6 million, continuation of some annual maintenance expense (already budgeted) and future annual rate revenue (dependent on configuration of lots acquired).
  • Option 4 - Acquire all lots and develop into 13 housing lots for sale. All three lots are acquired from the WAPC with independent valuations and developed for 13 housing lots. Land acquisition cost between $2.7 million to $2.9 million, estimated initial profit of $0.5 million, estimated future annual rate revenue in the order of $21,000.
  • Option 5 - Acquire all lots and develop into eight housing lots and maintain a reduce linkage to green space area. The Town would acquire all lots and maintain a linkage to green space albeit a reduced area. This would help lower the cost burden whilst allowing the maintenance of a greater linkage to green space than that which would otherwise result from not acquiring the lots. Land acquisition cost between $2.37 million to $2.9 million, estimated initial profit of $0.3 million, estimated future annual rate revenue (dependent on final design configuration).

What is happening now?

At the April Ordinary Council Meeting Council resolved to not purchase Lot 1003 (No. 7) Raleigh Street, Lot 1004 (No. 6) Raleigh Street, and Lot 1005 (No. 45) Bishopsgate Street, Carlisle from the Western Australian Planning Commission as identified in option one in the options analysis. More details can find in the April 2020 Council Minutes.

How can I find out more information?

  • Read the five development options in the document library.
  • Ask a question and we will respond.
  • Read more information in the document library or FAQ.
CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
  • Could the Town of Victoria Park provide a list of the Public Open Spaces in the Carlisle area and the associated sqm or percentage of the total area for Carlisle.

    methanol asked about 2 years ago

    Thank you for you question Greg. There is a total of 12.0215 ha of public open space in Carlisle

    • Parnham Park
    • Fletcher Park
    • Carlisle Reserve
    • Lathlain Carlisle bowling site
    • Miller's Crossing
    • Tom Write Park
    • Gemini Way Sump

  • Are the residential housing lots going to be affordable for low income families to purchase and maintain, or are they going to be targeted to wealthier people for a more upscale clientele? Urban infill is essential and needs to take place asap to stop the sprawl increasing. However opportunities need to be made available to those with less money coming in to the household instead of shoving them to the outskirts of Perth.

    Groodle asked about 2 years ago

    The options presented were based on current market value. Thank you

  • If the town were to purchase the land, what would the source of the capital be? And would there be an increase to the rates payed by property owners because of the purchase?

    David48 asked about 2 years ago

    Thank you for your question. Unfortunately this has not yet been determined. 

    Depending on the Option chosen, Council would need to consider one, or more, of the following actions;

    • Reduce current budget allocations on other projects (as per Section 6.8 of the Local Government Act 1995 (Expenditure from municipal fund not included in annual budget));

    • Change the purpose of Reserve fund holdings (as per Section 6.11 of the Local Government Act 1995 (Reserve accounts)); and

    • Undertake loan borrowings (as per Section 6.20 of the Local Government Act 1995 (Power to borrow).

    Loan borrowings and Reserve fund changes would require an advertising period if not included in the Annual Budget.

    Other options exist, such as seeking developer / private business partnerships, however these are not readily within the control of Council at this time